Stone Age CHEWING GUM

Stone Age CHEWING GUM

Stone age chewing gum reveals clues to a young girl who lived 5,700 years ago.

Lola is a young girl who lived in Denmark 5,700 years ago. She had blue eyes, dark skin, and dark hair. Her last meal included hazelnuts and mallard duck.

The reason we know this is because she chewed birch pitch, a material which functioned kinda like ancient chewing gum.

Stone age chewing gum
via financialexpress

Stone Age Chewing gum from a young girl 5,700 years ago

A study on the birch pitch revealed the girl’s entire genome and oral microbiome. Making this the first human genetic material besides from human bones. The study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.

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Birch pitch was what Palaeolithic people use as glue as many as 760,000 years ago. Somewhere along the way, they realized that they could chew it.

Theis Jensen, study author and postdoctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen’s Globe Institute said,

Syltholm is completely unique. Almost everything is sealed in mud, which means that the preservation of organic remains is absolutely phenomenal.

It is the biggest Stone Age site in Denmark, and the archaeological finds suggest that the people who occupied the site were heavily exploiting wild resources well into the Neolithic, which is the period when farming and domesticated animals were first introduced into southern Scandinavia.

The ancient chewing gum acted as a time capsule. Storing information from the past and revealed clues on how they used to live what they eat.

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